Volume 97, Issue 6 p. 541-544
Perspectives

Cannabis legalization with strict regulation, the overall superior policy option for public health

J Rehm

Corresponding Author

J Rehm

Social & Epidemiological Research Department, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada

Addiction Policy, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

Institute of Medical Science, University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine, Toronto, ON, Canada

Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

Institute of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy & Center of Clinical Epidemiology and Longitudinal Studies (CELOS), Technische Universität Dresden, Dresden, Germany

Correspondence: J Rehm ([email protected])Search for more papers by this author
B Fischer

B Fischer

Social & Epidemiological Research Department, Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, Toronto, ON, Canada

Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Search for more papers by this author
First published: 11 February 2015
Citations: 50

Abstract

Cannabis is the most prevalently used drug globally, with many jurisdictions considering varying reform options to current policies to deal with this substance and associated harm. Three policy options are available: prohibition, decriminalization, and legalization, with prohibition currently the dominant model globally.1 This contribution gives reasons why legalization with strict regulation should be considered superior to other options with respect to public health in high income countries in North America.