Volume 104, Issue 4 p. 606-609
Commentary

The Jury Is Still Out on the Benefits and Harms of Methylphenidate for Children and Adolescents With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

Ole Jakob Storebø

Corresponding Author

Ole Jakob Storebø

Psychiatric Research Unit, Region Zealand Psychiatry, Slagelse, Denmark

Department of Psychology, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark

Correspondence:

Ole Jakob Storebø ([email protected])

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Erlend Faltinsen

Erlend Faltinsen

Psychiatric Research Unit, Region Zealand Psychiatry, Slagelse, Denmark

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Morris Zwi

Morris Zwi

Islington Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service, Whittington Health National Health Service (NHS) Trust, London, UK

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Erik Simonsen

Erik Simonsen

Psychiatric Research Unit, Region Zealand Psychiatry, Slagelse, Denmark

Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark

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Christian Gluud

Christian Gluud

Copenhagen Trial Unit, Centre for Clinical Intervention Research, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark

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First published: 13 July 2018
Citations: 15

Abstract

Much remains unclear about the benefits and harms of methylphenidate for children and adolescents with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Between 2012 and 2018, we conducted two Cochrane systematic reviews on methylphenidate for ADHD. This article explores the main findings in relation to evidence-based practice and our current understanding of ADHD.1, 2

Conflict of Interest

Morris Zwi sits on the UK Paediatric Medicines Expert Advisory Group at the Medicines and Healthcare Regulatory Agency, which considers applications regarding the licensing of pediatric medicines. As a clinician working with patients who have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, he prescribes methylphenidate regularly.

Ole Jakob Storebø, Erlend Glasø Faltinsen, Christian Gluud, and Erik Simonsen report no conflicts of interest.